10 Nov 2019

On trend with short scarves and buttoned neckwarmers


The autumn days are well and truly upon us, with Halloween and Guy Fawkes Night behind us and the trees starting to take on their winter forms. So I want to continue with my “Accessories” series and this time I’m looking at short scarves and buttoned neckwarmers. 

Did you know that short scarves are this years “hot” fashion accessory? Well, I didn’t know until I made one for myself! Then I saw some e-mails and fashion postings about them and realised that, once again, I have found myself at the cutting edge of fashion! It doesn’t happen very often but it’s fun when ideas coincide isn’t it. 


I made this one as a slighter shorter version of my Elizabeth Scarf pattern using a lovely soft DK yarn. I love how this came out and the fact that it is so easy to carry. With the first chill days of winter coming you don't want to be the only person carrying an enormous scarf around, so this is an unobtrusive way to add some extra warmth without the fuss. 

Another thing about short scarves is that it doesn’t take a lot of yarn to make them, so that is a double benefit for knitters! 

You can fold it over your knees at a ball-game as a mini-blanket, or sit on it if you have only a cold bench to hand. Then when you’re ready to go on your way, you can slip it around your neck and keep the chills at bay as you cycle home.


The scarf using one of my favourite stitches in our Reversible Knitting Stitches collection, Hatfield Check. This is a deeply textural stitch so it packs a lot of warmth into a small space. That is important for a short scarf, of course, because you are not going to wrap the scarf around more than once so it needs to be super-cozy.

Then wrap it around once and pin it, tie it or button it in place. Or attach a faux-button so it’s in a set shape such as a cross-over V and slip it over your head. Alternatively, just drape it around your neck to provide some light warmth by your collar. There are lots of ways to wear short scarves, so they are very versatile.


Some years ago, I made another item that I have used and reused over the years, a buttoned neckwarmer. I made a couple of these way-back-when and every autumn they come out of the drawer again. I made one to team up with a crew-neck sweater, extending its usefulness into the coldest months, while the other was a slim-line version to fit under a coat.

Well both of those were showing signs of age so I decided to make some new ones and have been having fun knitting them. I have just published the pattern for these and am pleased to introduce the “Warmington” to you!


These feature a fold-down ribbed collar which is buttoned into place at one shoulder. Then two panels gently cover the top of your shoulders and extend down to cover the vulnerable front chest and back neck to give extra warmth. 

There are two versions and the first of these is in a lofty yarn, Eco Cloud by Cascade. This is a gorgeously warm cabled yarn with a wonderful texture and insulation. I can see this version would keep me warm even in the deepest snowy days ahead. It is perfect with my Barbour jacket and also teams well with a snowy crew-neck sweater I have. I can carry it with me like having a polo-neck in my pocket!


The second version is in an easy-care DK yarn, Coopworth “Socks Yeah” DK and I love the slight sheen and smooth finish of this version. This is a perfect weight for outings into the city. Slipped under a coat and buttoned into place it will keep you warm on your commute home.

The front and back panels are worked in Double Moss Stitch, which is a beautifully flat reversible stitch so it will sit neatly under a jacket or cardigan and not ruche up. Not only is it nice and flat, but Double Moss Stitch also has a lovely texture to provide warmth just where you need it.

Buttoned neckwarmers are perfect to slip on without having to pull them over your head. This makes them easy to take off when you get somewhere warmer and then put on again when you’re ready to head out of the door. And again, they are small, easy to carry and unobtrusive so you can keep warm without bulk.

I hope the last few blogposts have given you lots of ideas for neckwear to make for the cooler months. Next time I am going to post about how much yarn you need to make a scarf (always a dilemma for knitters) and then I will be turning my attention to hats!

For more details about the new Warmington Neckwarmer, please click here.

Until next time, Happy Knitting!

Moira





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